Procrastination did not just begin recently, it has been prevailing since ancient civilizations. The Greek poet Hesiod, mentioned in one of his writings around 800 B.C., cautioning not to “put your work off till tomorrow and the day after.” The Roman consul Cicero called procrastination “hateful” while conducting his affairs. According to APS Fellow Joseph Ferrari, a professor of psychology at DePaul University, “ Procrastination has nothing to do with time management. Making a chronic procrastinator do something would be like asking a clinically depressed person to cheer up.”

People who are habitual procrastinators exhibit high levels of stress and a low level of well being. Such people feel good even if they experience guilt, stress or have a bad image. Most people fear changes. Procrastination inhibits change

Most people fear changes. Procrastination inhibits change